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How do you respond to a resident who gets attention by pretending to be in pain?

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I am trying to prepare myself for a CNA interview tomorrow and found this question while searching for CNA interview questions. I'm a brand new CNA so I'm honestly not sure how I would handle this situation:
Mrs. Jones is in the facility for a fractured hip. She constantly likes attn. by putting on the call light pretending to be in pain. Everyone on the hall is ignoring her. You pass by the room and hear her crying what is your response?
Always remember this........Pain is what the patient says it is! This is what they teach us in nursing school!

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One of the first things you learn about pain is "pain is what the patient says it is."So you address it in the ways a CNA can address pain.

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Have to investigate if someone is crying out...something else could have happened, she;s most likely frightened, many issues can intensify pain...

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Mrs. Jones is in the facility for a fractured hip. She constantly likes attn. by putting on the call light pretending to be in pain. Everyone on the hall is ignoring her. You pass by the room and hear her crying what is your response?

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And if she's in the hospital for a fractured hip, shes NOT faking pain to get attention. She legitimately needs narcotics. As other posters have said, pain is whatever a patient says it is. The first thing you'll learn in the hospital is that people have different pain tolerances. Some will carry on, cry, wail and thrash in their beds. Others will literally bite the bedrails to keep from crying out. The stoic one doesn't necessarily feel less pain and the loud one isn't necessarily putting on a show. Sometimes this is a cultural thing. Sometimes it's just a personal thing. But if you have a patient who is crying out and the staff is avoiding going to her aid, there's something seriously wrong there. And it's not the patient.

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I absolutley agree with the other posters....the pain is what the patient says it is! This poor lady is doing more than saying....she's crying and moaning....what makes you think she is trying to get attention? Especially as you have no experience.We are taught in nursing school and we observe in clinicals and of course on the floor working that pain is manifested in many ways. Not all of them are verbal. In fact, most are not. I worked in PICU for many, many years. Other than crying, signs of pain are grimacing, guarding, tachycardia, tachypnea, rocking, moaning, and also acting out. This list is not all inclusive. I am sure there are more I am forgetting right now.THis lady needs an advocate...someone to find out why she is in pain and then FIX it. I hope you develop a little more compassion as you work...I sure would not want to have anyone taking care of my 86year old mother with an attitude like this.Unresolved pain is an issue that is near and dear to my heart....I have had 4 major surgeries and know first hand what it is like to lay in a hospital bed in extreme pain and see and hear the staff go on about their business.Until I called for an anesthesia consult...but that's another story.s

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Quote from FlordagirlI am trying to prepare myself for a CNA interview tomorrow and found this question while searching for CNA interview questions. I'm a brand new CNA so I'm honestly not sure how I would handle this situation:Mrs. Jones is in the facility for a fractured hip. She constantly likes attn. by putting on the call light pretending to be in pain. Everyone on the hall is ignoring her. You pass by the room and hear her crying what is your response?

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Fractured hip = pain.I don't know why she would need to pretend.

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Quote from SWS RN I hope you develop a little more compassion as you work...I sure would not want to have anyone taking care of my 86year old mother with an attitude like this.

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what makes you think she is trying to get attention? Especially as you have no experience?I hope you develop a little more compassion as you work...I sure would not want to have anyone taking care of my 86year old mother with an attitude like this.

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Quote from SWS RNI hope you develop a little more compassion as you work...I sure would not want to have anyone taking care of my 86year old mother with an attitude like this.

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Quote from rn/writerThis was NOT the OP's attitude. She was quoting a site with possible questions for CNAs job interviews.
Author: alice  3-06-2015, 16:30   Views: 1028   
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