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This week I have learned... (5/30/15)

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27 This week I have learned.....

1. Cocaine is still a hell of a drug.
2. No matter how nice you are to everyone, there will be an "us vs. them" vibe between hospital divisions when you're a nurse. It makes me sad because I've gone out of my way to be nice to the workers of the rest of my facility. Can't win them all.
3. Making sure your nurse knows you have breast implants can prevent an embarrassing ICU transfer when a dislodged boob looks like a hematoma.
4. I miss night shift.
5. I'm allergic to Vicks vapo rub.
6. On a related note, I met my match in a colostomy bag and it was horrible.
7. Giving the caregiver the hand written prescriptions for the dementia lady STILL doesn't prevent an angry call from her the next day when she can't figure out which pharmacy has her meds.
8. I effing love the ED, but holy monkeys it makes me sore.
9. There really is no polite way to say, "Welcome to our hospital, new overly cocky (but strangely beautiful) 12-year old surgeon. By the way, if you don't want to get paged for the inpatient management of your surgical patients, then do us ALL a favor and transfer them to the hospitalist."
10. I feel a schadenfreude-like joy when I see the PVT is wrong, especially when people lose money and post about it on a 700-page thread that tells them what NOT to do. (Okay, that's really more of a confession than something I "learned".)

Bonus one - I've only been at this gig for a year and my already dark sense of humor has become sick to the point of disturbing.

What have you learned?
Nothing nearly as interesting. I learned the pathophysiology behind why progesterone stops your periods, and what to do for breakthrough bleeding while on progesterone. Our clinic only has a physician once a week, but they're all so incredibly knowledgeable, I love to pick their brains when they're there.If I could do it over, I would become a reproductive endocrinologist.

Comment:
Quote from kloneNothing nearly as interesting. I learned the pathophysiology behind why progesterone stops your periods, and what to do for breakthrough bleeding while on progesterone. Our clinic only has a physician once a week, but they're all so incredibly knowledgeable, I love to pick their brains when they're there.If I could do it over, I would become a reproductive endocrinologist.

Comment:
That menopause really really sucks. No periods from August to April. Then 3 within 5 weeks. This stinks. That losing a parent hurts no matter what your age. (OK, that was in the past month, but whatever)That no matter how hard you try, there are families that you just cannot please.

Comment:
The more track marks you have, the more entitled you feel to sandwiches, blankets, taxi vouchers, using my lobby as a bedroom, and unlimited prescriptions for narcotics.Whining "that's not fair" when you don't get any of them does not make me feel sorry for you. Especially when you weren't even the patient that checked in.

Comment:
I learned that when a physician says of his co-worker "She's really a nice person" it isn't a compliment. That it's best to not wait until you get off your shift to go to the ED for stroke like symptoms, unless you enjoy being lectured by: the nursing staff, all of whom you know, the doctors, all of whom you know and even the rad techs, because they work with your husband.That even the most annoying patient needs to have an advocate, especially when his family has completely abandoned him and he truly is all alone in the world.That spending 5 to 10 minutes just chit chatting makes a world of different to that patient.That if you share a concern with a doctor, and they tell you that they'll look into it, and there is not a positive change int he patients condition or a change in meds to bring about said change, ride his sorry backside until he does do something. because if you don't, that patient might end up on the unit in grave condition.And that you have to laugh at yourself. A lot. Because the alternative is just to scary to think of.

Comment:
Quote from Pepper The CatThat menopause really really sucks. No periods from August to April. Then 3 within 5 weeks. This stinks. That losing a parent hurts no matter what your age. (OK, that was in the past month, but whatever)

Comment:
Quote from CelticGoddessI had to comment on these two: I am in peri-menopause and I concur. It bloody stinks. I'll have a 3 week period then two weeks later have another one. And the nuclear meltdowns? Aye yi yi.And you are right. It does hurt to lose a patient. I have gone out to my care at the end of my shift and bawled like a baby. But there are times when I have felt peace, because I did my best to help at patient, who was ready to go, find a bit of comfort in the end.

Comment:
Quote from Pepper The Catyes to the menopause.But it was losing a parent, not patient.

Comment:
The boob story made me laugh, thanks!High ammonia levels really do cause severe brain damage and you can actually herniate if your ammonia level gets too high. My patient with an ammonia level over 1100 started seizing and blew her pupils before she died. It was ugly. I'm even number than I realized. One of the unit RTs confided in me that she cried over a different patient of mine's death when she hit the car in the morning, and cried multiple times throughout the day because she felt so awful for the patient. I hadn't even shed a single tear. My coworkers are even more evil and more cliquey than I had originally thought. I hate that I learned this because I have really tried to give them the benefit of the doubt.I learned that if you have a severe allergy, you should always carry Epi on you even if it's unlikely that you are going to run into your allergen, even if you haven't had to use your Epi in decades, and especially if you have dependents. It's no fun withdrawing on a young adult with young children who had a major anoxic brain injury from an allergic reaction.I also learned that doing compressions on someone with a developing bowel obstruction will result in fecal matter spewing everywhere. I'm starting to think it's always best to gown up before compressions if there is time, just in case.It has not been a good month and I need a vacation.

Comment:
Quote from calivianyaThe boob story made me laugh, thanks!High ammonia levels really do cause severe brain damage and you can actually herniate if your ammonia level gets too high. My patient with an ammonia level over 1100 started seizing and blew her pupils before she died. It was ugly. I'm even number than I realized. One of the unit RTs confided in me that she cried over a different patient of mine's death when she hit the car in the morning, and cried multiple times throughout the day because she felt so awful for the patient. I hadn't even shed a single tear. My coworkers are even more evil and more cliquey than I had originally thought. I hate that I learned this because I have really tried to give them the benefit of the doubt.I learned that if you have a severe allergy, you should always carry Epi on you even if it's unlikely that you are going to run into your allergen, even if you haven't had to use your Epi in decades, and especially if you have dependents. It's no fun withdrawing on a young adult with young children who had a major anoxic brain injury from an allergic reaction.I also learned that doing compressions on someone with a developing bowel obstruction will result in fecal matter spewing everywhere. I'm starting to think it's always best to gown up before compressions if there is time, just in case.It has not been a good month and I need a vacation.

Comment:
I'm a student so mine are a little different. I learned that it's best to use small post it notes in your planner/calendar for school because the syllabus will change at least 3 times in the first 2 days of classes. I learned that my voice defaults to hostile when I try to ask a question that I am not sure how to phrase. My face also defaults to angry/hostile when I am not actively thinking about how my face looks. -I need to work on my Nina-verbal communication. I also learned that I should keep my views on health insurance to myself.

Comment:
Quote from CCRN2BEWow, you have had a heck of a month I'm guessing you work in a SICU or some sort of trauma unit?Great stories though, although they are no doubt not great for the mentioned patients or their families
Author: jone  5-06-2015, 17:51   Views: 2086   
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