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Can an RN work as a sitter?

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Several of my non nurse friends are working as overnight sitters. IT is a low stress job. I am wondering if I can do this even though I have an RN license? The companies aroung here also hire CNAs. Am I allowed to do that job? I am in Maryland.

At some point if I let my renewal of my RN license lapse will I be able to do a CNA job or are you always denied these positions by having an RN license. Its seems unfair to me.

Thanks for any input, I am looking for a low stress part time thing.
Some people have posted that this type of situation is not allowed in their state. You should contact your state Board and ask. Where I am, RNs can work at jobs below their license, as a matter of fact, many do. And when it comes to homecare, the private client can hire anyone they desire. But if you are being paid by an agency, you would have to go with what the agency wants for their employees.

Comment:
Although my hospital looks down on doing this, they will sometimes pay an RN their RN wage to sit for a patient if they are DESPERATE. I had a co-worker get on-call pay (time & half + travel time + $5.00 extra/hr) to sit for 12 hours... thus she was making close to $50/hr to sit for a patient! They were in desperate need and absolutely could not find anyone else to sit. I am not sure on the laws here in my state (or hospital policy) regarding allowing an RN to work as LPN or CNA. If you are looking for a part-time low stress job, I would recommend home health care. I am sure there are some home health jobs that are stressful but I currently do home health care for pediatric patients. I care for infants and toddlers who have tracheostomies and are ventilator dependent.. easy easy work! I don't make a ton at it ($30/hour) but I do 8 hour shifts and I do a few a month.

Comment:
of course a rn can work as a sitter (each state's definition of what a sitter is could be differ though), heck someone with NO medical degree/certification/license can be a sitter. the only time a person has to have a specific degree/certification/license is when the payor (medicaid, medicare, private insurance, etc) requires it.

Comment:
Quote from ItsTheDudeof course a rn can work as a sitter (each state's definition of what a sitter is could be differ though), heck someone with NO medical degree/certification/license can be a sitter. the only time a person has to have a specific degree/certification/license is when the payor (medicaid, medicare, private insurance, etc) requires it.

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Why can't an RN work as a CNA? (assuming he or she is paid the CNA wage) Are the states afraid she might accidentally start an IV? Seems to me that if you know your scope of practice as an RN, it wouldn't be too hard to figure out what not to do when you're working as a CNA. The only difference I can see is that they get the RN assessment skills for free, in that the RN-working-as-aide might pick up on something in the course of performing CNA duties and refer it to the RN responsible for her pt sooner than someone without that education.Help me understand, because I probably am missing a crucial concept here. . . TIA

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Quote from nursel56Why can't an RN work as a CNA? (assuming he or she is paid the CNA wage) Are the states afraid she might accidentally start an IV? Seems to me that if you know your scope of practice as an RN, it wouldn't be too hard to figure out what not to do when you're working as a CNA. The only difference I can see is that they get the RN assessment skills for free, in that the RN-working-as-aide might pick up on something in the course of performing CNA duties and refer it to the RN responsible for her pt sooner than someone without that education.Help me understand, because I probably am missing a crucial concept here. . . TIA

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In Ohio, a person has to work at the level of their licensure. Once an RN, that person cannot go and work as an LPN if they do not like their RN job. Some LTC or AL facilities will pay an LPN her nurse's wages and schedule them to do care associate work.

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Again check with your state board. I believe that even if you are working below your license, you are still held to the liability of an RN. So say your unit has no techs for the day but an extra RN who works as the "tech;" this RN is still held to the legal responsibility of an RN when interacting with pts on the shift.

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Quote from RunningRNBSNI think what the OP is concerned about certain state laws -- there are certain states that for example will not allow an RN to work as a CNA (even if they hold both licenses).

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thanks for all the responses. Babs that is what I am concerned about. Does this apply if y0u have EVER had an RN license. By that I mean if you let your license lap at some point, say because you dont want to work as an RN anymore, then can you work as say a CNA.Just another little tidbit of info nursing school leaves out.IT is so difficult to get a response from the MD board of nursing on licensing I hope it is easier to find out an answer to this question!

Comment:
Something to consider is that even though you would be working as a sitter is that you are still an RN and will be held to the standard of one. If the patient exhibits symptoms you could be held responsible for the outcome. This is one of the fears I have about being a doula and RN. I was a doula at a friends labor at a hospital I do not work at. Since I was not employed there I can not touch any of their equipment. A situation happened where if I was the nurse I would turn the pitocin off. The only thing I could do was call the nurse; but if something were to happen I could still be held responsible? Its a sticky, weird situation to be in when you take a non-nursing position as a nurse.

Comment:
Quote from AggieNurse99Again check with your state board. I believe that even if you are working below your license, you are still held to the liability of an RN. So say your unit has no techs for the day but an extra RN who works as the "tech;" this RN is still held to the legal responsibility of an RN when interacting with pts on the shift.
Author: alice  3-06-2015, 16:31   Views: 1012   
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