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Magnet Hospital Nursing Question

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In my STNA class today we had a guy come in and talk to us about continuing education and he mentioned that all the hospitals in our area are planning on getting magnet status. From what he said it sounds like in order to work in these hospitals you will have to have your BSN or MSN, is this true? I am currently debating between an LPN program or an RN program but it's not a BSN program. Does this mean that I will have to get my BSN in order to work at a local hospital? I don't really have the financial aid to go for a bachelor's degree so I really don't know what to do here. Anyone have any information about the magnet status? Anyone having problems finding jobs because of it?
I currently work for a hospital listed in the top 5 in the nation, and that has long held Magnet status.At least 2/3s of the nurses on my unit (considered one of the more advanced in the facility) are Associate degree nurses.

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i have an ADN and work at a magnet hospital (for 2 more weeks anyway) and had no problem getting the job. once i did hire on, i noticed that TONS of my coworkers were in school online to get their BSN's or MSN's, and we have a great tuition reimbursement program. so that's what got me inspired to go back to school. i think that magnet hospitals prefer to have BSN nurses, i think it looks better for their records, but i have never known it to be a hinderance to getting a job at a magnet facility.

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Less than 7% of hospitals currently have magnet status so don't worry, all the hospitals in your area will not have it anytike soon.

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It can take years for a hospital to institute all of the qualifying measures needed to obtain Magnet status and then amass the documentation to verify that they meet all of the requirements.And, as others have said, Magnet looks for a percentage of BSN-trained nurses in relation to ADN or diploma nurses. If they insisted on all BSNs most places would shut down immediately with their own highly specific nursing shortage.I would encourage you to go for your ADN. Few hospitals employ LPNs these days, and of those that do, almost none are hiring them. With an ADN, you can build on your education with the added benefit of accessing tuition assistance or reimbursement programs. You can take classes on line or via distance education. Or you can take a couple of local classes a semester until you have completed your BSN.Once you have your ADN, you could immediately enroll in one class that you think is manageable. This can tell an interviewer that you are determined to further your education and make you more marketable.Good luck.

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Magnet hospitals have a requirement for new grad program-BSN. If you are new grad and they have other people for the same position, than BSN applicant is a preference.

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While all the above answers sound really good, take it from a recent ASN grad.... If there was any way to scrounge up the funds for a BSN, I would definiely take that route. I'm saying this not just because you want to work at a magnet hospital, but more importantly you want to work period. In this economy, there are way too many new grads coming out and unable to find a job. Its taken almost a year or even more for some. There are threads all over the site about this. Where I live in the Phila, PA region, you're pretty much screwed without a BSN as more and more hospitals (about 10) only accept BSN nurses. The same thing is happening in states around PA. Not to say that you can't get hired with an ASN; I certainly did, but its not without sacrifice. Be prepared to travel.To everyone else who may read this, don't bite my head off. I'm just trying to give some perspective from a standpoint of someone who's newer to the field and is entering into a "manager's market". It's just my opinion.

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At my hospital they are phasing out LVNs. I think by the end of the summer we wont have any LVNs employed with us. They are giving the LVNs the option of going back to school and staying on board or leaving. They are also not accepting any new hire that does not have their bachelors degree. So even RNs with an ADN wont be considered.I think to be safe you should go for your RN. Even if it's an ADN it might be safer in the long run.

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Magnet status since 1995 here and I was told on hire I was the last ADN to be hired.Tait

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I was concerned about this as well. I have 2 degrees already so I chose to get my ADN, then bridge to a MSN. We have one hospital in my area who has said BSN's only. There are in the process of applying for magnet status. But, I have a friend who got her ADN and knew someone who worked there. Low and behold, she just started a few weeks ago!! They told her that for the very first time they can be picky and it just is one way to weed out applicants. They just switched to BSN's only in the last year, long after they started the magnet process. But, that is one hospital. I certainly can't speak about every hospital in the country.I found this link from the magnet website. http://www.nursecredentialing.org/Ma...teristics.aspxAs you can see, the average for magnet institutions is at least half or slightly less than half, have a ADN or diploma degree.Also, from the ANA website - "In 2005, Associate Degree programs were 58.9% of all U.S. basic programs". Add to this the percentage the diploma programs as well. There are far more non BSN graduates out there so there is no way the majority of hospitals can say BSN only. I personally plan on getting my BSN immediately after I graduate so I just won't have to worry about it. Thank god for tuition assistance and online classes!!

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Going into my second semester, recipient of a scholarship from the local hospital along with 10 others in ASN programs and recently selected for an externship there. They have said they will pay for me to get my BSN but want me to work a year first at the hospital. So in my circumstance it definitely didn't seem to matter.

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I work at a magnet faciltity and we are told that all new hires will be BSN unless you can make a good case for hiring an ADN. Now, if we have one of the floors that no one wants to work on and all you have are ADN's then they will hire ADN for that floor...go figure.

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I was an ADN at a wonderful magnet facility working in open heart transplant... go figure, the unit where you'd see all the letters behind the name... but I came with 10 years ICU exp. I was encouraged, never forced into a BSN, annual review would be... go for your BSN and CCRN....yeah yeah... but no extra $$ in it.. so I didn't.my point is that this hospital was hiring ADN's and strongly encouraged the BSN because Magnet want's a certain percent to have advanced degrees.The financial yearly tiered system didn't provide enough incentive for me to invest at that time in a BSN, I had to take a 2% raise instead of 3%...... and that was it.They have basic entry slots to fill... always... but you WILL loose a job offer to a new grad BSN, hands down any day. If your OK with that or not OK, you know what your decision is. I can't make it for you. The finances for a BSN never play out... but know that I'm working on it now... because I'm sick and tired of being the only ADN and in charge and teaching these newbies that have advanced degrees, but little financial incentive.other facilities may be more generous to encourage a higher education, so keep that in mind.
Author: jone  3-06-2015, 16:30   Views: 1207   
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